Site Loader

There can non be anything as far removed from ground and saneness than the construct of force. which all at one time evokes actions and workss produced by a cardinal response to a specific event. It is frequently associated with the behaviour of animate beings. who largely have non had the benefit of instruction. value-formation. and faith. But in some rare fortunes. force may really be justified—or at least brought closer to ground. The consequence would be sort of a ‘rational violence’ . an oxymoron in its most actual sense. yet the best description available for the two narratives in focal point.

Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” and Flannery O’Connor’s “A Good Man is Difficult to Find” are two of the most famed narratives in American literature—and a twosome of the most remembered in footings of representations of force. “The Lottery” . an eerie narrative that unfurls a cover of somberness over the typical. picture-perfect American town. is such because behind the brawny pockets and smiling faces of this seemingly affluent community lies a tradition that malodor of crude and heathen overtones—the lapidation of one member.

While evidently barbarian. unlogical. and downright felon. this act of force had the blessing of the whole population. because it functioned as a ‘sacrifice’ in exchange for all the advancement. fortune. and wealth that they had experienced. Even the mode by which this procedure was carried out—drawing of tonss per household. and household member—was rendered so consistently that one would ne’er anticipate the violent intent of the event. On the other manus. “A Good Man is Difficult to Find” . unlike “The Lottery” . connects force with a beginning credible plenty for this association.

The Misfit. long established and feared from the start of the narrative till the terminal. embodies the kernel of force because of his qualities as a liquidator ; but his visual aspect in the terminal negates the stereotype of a felon. what with hair that “was merely get downing to gray” . every bit good as “silver-rimmed eyeglassess that gave him a scholarly look” . But aside from his deficiency of proper vesture. it was his mode of address that gave him away—not the clearly unpolished linguistic communication. but the apparently intelligent epigrams that really escape any signifier of logic.

To the reader who falls victim to the whole pretence of the grandmother’s happening a “good man” . the Misfit would look like the antithesis of liquidators and felons because of his bogus self-respect and intelligence. In both narratives. force was ne’er the result of a battle. bash. or misconstruing. nor did it consequence from robbery. retaliation. or simple insanity. Violence in the narratives was horrifyingly about a mundane and needed project: in “The Lottery” . it was necessary to incur force for practical grounds. and for the town’s general public assistance ; while force in “A Good Man…

” was depicted to be merely a regular occupation that had to be done. no different from cleaning one’s backyard of plagues or acquiring rid of an remarkably bothersome insect. Both narratives presented the sort of human nature that may non be existent. yet credible in its literary portraiture. But the most distinguishable and interesting in both narratives discussed is the successful effort to set up a state of affairs that was cheery at best. and mean for the most portion.

The approachs and departures of a little town and normal household spat are hardly forerunners of force ; which is why it may be observed that this symbolizes human nature every bit good. Violence is non expected from people without any aggravation ; but a little town’s tradition and the normal efficiency of a inmate prove that logic does non ever produce all possible equations. Clearly. force is portion of human nature—and being as detached from it as possible in order to consequence the same produced by a more emotional connexion does non decrease its gravitation and offense.

Post Author: admin